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linkedin lead generation

AJ Wilcox – Get Yourself Noticed by the Right People – Why LinkedIn Lead Generation Might be Perfect for Your Business (AoL 126)

When many of us online business folks think of running an ad campaign, we immediately think of Facebook. However, that market is totally saturated and it might not be the greatest fit for your business – especially if your customers are other businesses.

If you think that might be the case, today’s guest, AJ Wilcox, might just be your new favorite marketer. His specialty is helping B2B businesses market on LinkedIn.

This is an almost a nonexistent niche. In fact, when AJ was learning about it, he realized there were relatively no search results for LinkedIn Ad Campaigns. So he’s definitely the guy to know!

In today’s chat with AJ, Harrison and I discover who this opportunity is a good match for and some key things to know when you’re getting your feet wet!

SPECIFICALLY, YOU’LL FIND OUT MORE ABOUT:

  • What did AJ do before he started his own marketing business? 10:22
  • What’s the difference between doing ads on LinkedIn vs other social media platforms? 12:40
  • Are the ads on LinkedIn strictly B2B or is there room for B2C advertising? 14:41
  • What’s the UI like for LinkedIn when it comes to placing ads? 18:13
  • What should newbies consider when they’re first placing ads on LinkedIn? 19:33
  • What’s a good way for a beginner to budget their ads so that they actually move the needle? 21:44
  • How has LinkedIn changed over the years as a whole? 24:39
  • How is videos changing LinkedIn and can people use them in ads? 28:35
  • What are the metrics that matter on LinkedIn when someone is running a campaign? 31:43
  • What are mistakes that newbies make when they’re starting with marketing on LinkedIn? 33:45
  • Are there some trends that AJ sees on the horizon? 36:35
  • Might LinkedIn start using Chatbots and other AI on their site soon? 39:05
  • What does AJ think about the barriers that are preventing social media platforms from fully utilizing AI? 42:49
  • What’s the experience like to work with AJ? 44:21
  • How does he incorporate his faith into his business? 46:49
  • What’s he looking forward to in the future? 48:26
  • What are AJ’s top 3 favorite podcasts? 49:23
  • If LinkedIn wasn’t a thing, what would he be doing? 50:52
  • One thing all high school students must know? 51:47
  • Something under $100 that has changed his life? 53:58
  • What’s the secret to achieving personal freedom? 55:23

Right click here and save-as to download this episode to your computer.

 

ITEMS and PEOPLE MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE:

SHOW NOTE EXTRAS:

The Ultimate LinkedIn Ad Checklist

Do’s and Don’ts of LinkedIn Ads

Search Ads vs Social Ads

How to Structure Your Social Ads


Thanks for Listening!

Thanks so much for joining us again this week. Have some feedback you’d like to share? Leave a note in the comment section below!

If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the top of the post.

Also, please leave an honest review for The AoL Podcast on iTunes! Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated! They do matter in the rankings of the show, and we read each and every one of them.

If you have any questions feel free to email them over via the email mentioned in the show or by our contact form.

And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on CastboxiTunesStitcherSoundcloud, and/or Google Play Music. It’s absolutely free to do so.

A huge thank-you to you guys for joining us!

Cheers!

content creator

Tori Reid – Become a Master Content Creator! Why Blogging Should Still be a Part of Your Content Strategy (AoL 115)

Lots of people would say that blogging as we know it is dead. There’s little ROI on it because you have to compete with all the other blogs that are out there.

That’s why a lot of people use Medium as their blogging platform. They then link those posts on social media hoping that the eyeballs see it.

However, today’s guest, Tori Reid, suggests otherwise.

She says that people still find blogs and other websites when they want to find information. However, when it comes to personal connection, that’s when they hop on social media.

Knowing this is important to content creators.

As are many other pointers.

This is what Tori’s group helps people with – keeping on top of what’s popular in the content creation world and how to get it out in a way that resonates with its intended audience.

In today’s chat with Tori, we find out how she got into content writing in the first place, how she started writing for LifeHacker, and her thoughts on blogging in 2018 and beyond.

Enjoy!

 

SPECIFICALLY, YOU’LL FIND OUT MORE ABOUT:

  • How’d Tori end up in Columbus and what are some of the benefits of working there as an entrepreneur? 11:20
  • What was it like to wake up to 1000 members in her Facebook group? 18:19
  • How did she get into content writing? 19:35
  • What was the pivot moment that she decided to drop out of school to pursue her business? 23:39
  • How did Tori become a writer for LifeHacker? 25:15
  • Why did she change her focus from blog writing to content development? 29:01
  • Can people still create successful brands online without putting a hub of theirs on a social media app? 32:44
  • What was the point where things start getting traction in her online career? 36:38
  • What’s a way for introverts to ease themselves into doing Facebook Lives? 40:01
  • What are a few tips that someone can utilize to craft a better selling message? 42:22
  • What’s Tori looking forward to doing in 2018? 48:24
  • What are her top 3 favorite books? 51:59
  • What’s something she’s learned to say no and what realizations have helped with that? 52:45
  • Something that she believes is going to affect entrepreneurs in the near future? 54:22
  • What bad advice does Tori hear adults giving children that she disagrees with? 56:34

Right click here and save-as to download this episode to your computer.

 

ITEMS and PEOPLE MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE:

 

SHOW NOTE EXTRAS:

Getting Over Creative Blocks:

Upgrade Your Atmosphere, Upgrade Your Business:

The Art of Networking:

Landon Porter Interview:

Thanks for Listening!

Thanks so much for joining us again this week. Have some feedback you’d like to share? Leave a note in the comment section below!

If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the top of the post.

Also, please leave an honest review for The AoL Podcast on iTunes! Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated! They do matter in the rankings of the show, and we read each and every one of them.

If you have any questions feel free to email them over via the email mentioned in the show or by our contact form.

And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunesStitcherSoundcloud, and/or Google Play Music. It’s absolutely free to do so.

A huge thank-you to you guys for joining us!

Cheers!

Repurposing Content Roundup

Repurposing Content Roundup: How to Use Your Content Sawdust

As online content makers, we all put a ton of work into the content that we create. That work takes time. And unless you’re some 5th dimension alien being that has no problem traveling in the 4th dimension (which is time), then you probably don’t have the minutes in a day to make new piece after new piece of content for each platform you’re on.

However, that’s not too say you should just throw one piece out there, forget about it and move on to the next. On the other hand, it also doesn’t mean that you should go out there and post “20 posts on Facebook a day”.

There is a happy medium between making one post and moving on to the next (which is highly ineffective) to repeatedly saying “Hey everyone! Check this out!” 10+ times a day (which is another highly ineffective way to get your message out there).

What’s a way to produce that content in a way that isn’t overwhelming? And what’s the correct amount?

Content “Sawdust”

In a video that came out last week, Gary Vaynerchuck dropped this word to describe macro-content. While I had heard of his strategy from Brendon Burchard, in how he uses quotes for Instagram and Facebook, I hadn’t really thought about applying it to anything else than that platform.

Essentially content sawdust is little snippets from the main content. As Gary said, when people think of .gif pictures, that is a form of sawdust. When you see a trailer for a movie, that consists of sawdust. Heck, you might even be able to think of sawdust as that thing that Paul Harvey used to do before he did his Midday NEWS or The Rest of the Story.

(Speaking of Paul Harvey, Mike Rowe – yes, from Dirty Jobs – is starting a new podcast that Paul Harvey was an inspiration for. Check that out here!)

Know Thy Platform

Before you go posting content sawdust, you need to know how to work the platform that you’re posting that sawdust on.

For example, the topic of this post came to me last week from one of my favorite Facebook Groups: The Expert Community. If you don’t know about Facebook Groups and how they’re helping online business in 2016, then you have a few things to learn about how Facebook currently works.

In the old days, before Pages, Groups were the place where people could come together and discuss things that they had an interest in. I know that when I was going to Purdue, that I made several off the wall ones. So did some of my friends.

One of the ones that I was proudest of was called the 10/22 Club. It started of as a club at Purdue who members had their birthday on October 22nd. Very elitist, right? Haha.

Back then, you could search for people by birthday. And, if I recall correctly, I had 25 members at one point. However, by this point, it had grown beyond Purdue itself.

Eventually, Pages did come into the picture, and when they did – groups essentially stopped having a purpose. If you had a Page, you could essentially create a profile for an organization, game, or anything else that wasn’t just one person. Dogs, cats, birthday clubs… you name it.

Just like you can on your own wall, a Page could post something and people who liked that page would see it on their feeds. Groups never had the ability to really do this.

Technically, that’s still the way Pages work. Unfortunately for us business owners, things changed again about 2 years ago. To get more than 10% of your followers to see what you posted on a Page, you have to pay for it – regardless of what the Page is being used for. I call this the Page Pay to Play. It’s very one direction.

In retaliation(?) to this, groups started making a comeback. However, instead of just passively posting things on your page wall, with groups, you have to pay attention to the rules of the group. Many don’t support posts to external links. They fear that the use of external links will drive people away from the group. A greedy owner of the group might see this as a threat.

Personally, I feel the more the merrier. As long as posts are relevant to the group and are offering free value to the members – it’s a great thing to do. However, if spam starts entering then, you might just have to draw some lines. Simply come up some rules in which the community has to follow. That’s why big groups with 1000+ members often have themes and rules when it comes to what’s going on each day.

Another thing about groups is that you actually have to engage and become connected to the people in the group. To do this well, I think you really have to think of it more as a community and not so much of an authority page.

That said, I think Facebook has become community driven. You just have to be willing to friend up to the max of 5000 people if you want it to work that way for you. Otherwise, go with the Page Pay to Play method.

That all being said, you’ll have to figure out how to use the platform that you want to connect with your audiences on. Do you use Instagram? What works over there? Do you use Snapchat? How does that work? Periscope? Again – figure out the best way to package the sawdust to those audiences.

If you want some specific examples of how you can package sawdust from your blog posts, specifically, you can check out Pat’s examples here.

Correct Amount to Post

If you feel I haven’t answered this part indirectly already, then I’ll go ahead an answer it directly here. The correct amount to post is… ::drumroll::

…up to you.

Brendon posts 4 times a day. He uses 2 posts that he made that morning. I’ve seen him do 2 images on Instagram and 2 on Facebook. Specifically he says his times are 7am, 11am, 3pm, and 7pm for those posts. He posts many of his YouTube videos on Sunday (who does that?).

Pat posts several times a day. I wasn’t able to pin down exactly other than a 9am post, a midday post, and an after work post. Generally speaking he does a good job of posting on the weekends a couple of times. However, when he’s traveling – he kinda goes through all the platforms. On his trip to the Food Blogger Conference in Salt Lake City this past weekend, he ended up Instagramming a pic of his luggage during the day. Then later, he did a ‘scope and then a couple of Facebook Live posts in the evening. As well as saying thanks to the people he had dinner with and the tours he got though the rest of the weekend.

Gary posts… well, I haven’t been able to pin it down yet. But I’m assuming it’s similar – AND he has a guy shadowing him for DailyVee. So, it’s not necessarily a one man band. If you’re really interested in when his accounts post (or anyone) – make an account on IFTTT and create a recipe that monitors certain accounts and posts the message on a spreadsheet. Then from there you can see patterns after a week of monitoring.

Action Steps:

So this week, as you’re creating your new epic posts. I want you to start going through some of the work you’ve already done. See if there’s anything in there that you might be able to say to yourself “man, that was good!”. Quote it and repackage it.

So many people don’t reuse the evergreen content they have. If you’re on a budget (like me) use what’s free and what you can afford to spend. If you have some extra funds to try some other stuff, get a subscription to Edgar or something similar. Spend some time coming up with a daily and monthly plan of how you can line up content. Make themed weeks. If that goes well, start doing themed months!